New mobile app reports deliver insight on app engagement

2013 Trend:  Invest­ment in Mobile Apps

Accord­ing to a sur­vey of mar­ket­ing man­agers by Gart­ner, invest­ments in mobile apps and tablet apps are among the top pri­or­i­ties for dig­i­tal mar­keters in 2013.  Across all busi­ness ver­ti­cals, mobile apps are a key ele­ment of a cus­tomer loy­alty and reten­tion strat­egy that enables con­sumers to con­nect with busi­nesses any­time and anyplace.

Busi­ness Need:

Given the increased invest­ment in mobile apps, exist­ing cus­tomers of Adobe Ana­lyt­ics have requested enhanced sup­port for mobile app ana­lyt­ics across all lead­ing plat­forms (Apple iOS, Android, and Windows).

Solu­tion:

With the April release of Adobe Ana­lyt­ics, cus­tomers now receive the fol­low­ing capabilities:

  • Easy access to pre-defined mobile app reports within web user interface

 

 

  • Mobile app overview report that includes key met­rics for launches, daily engaged users, aver­age ses­sion length, crash rate, top devices, OS ver­sions, and mobile carriers.

 

  • Under­stand the lifes­pan of your appli­ca­tion through the mobile app “life­cy­cle” reports. Met­rics and dimen­sion include installs, monthly engaged users, upgrades, install date, days since first use, days since last use, hour of day, and day of week, oper­at­ing sys­tem and device name.  Here is an exam­ple of the “days since first use” report that shows the % of vis­its that have taken place since the app was first downloaded.

 

Ben­e­fits:

  • View and ana­lyze mobile app engage­ment in one place within Adobe Analytics.
  • Eas­ily change and cus­tomize the pre­de­fined reports to match your spe­cific needs.
  • Ana­lyze all “life­cy­cle” met­rics and dimen­sions that flow into advanced seg­men­ta­tion capa­bil­i­ties (Dis­cover) and ad-hoc analy­sis & report­ing (Report Builder).  For exam­ple, see the fol­low­ing blog­post that dis­cusses how to setup mobile “cohort” analy­sis with Report Builder.

 

How to Access:

  • Clients must imple­ment their app with the ver­sion 3.0 App SDKs to receive the life­cy­cle met­rics and dimen­sions in Adobe Ana­lyt­ics.  Visit the “Devel­oper Con­nec­tion” to down­load the SDK or read the doc­u­men­ta­tion for each mobile platform.
  • From the Admin Con­sole inter­face, your Ana­lyt­ics admin can use the “Report Suite Man­ager” to enable the pre­de­fined mobile app reports for view­ing by all users.

 

Mobile Ad Revenues Will Top $11.4 Billion In 2013, Up 19% On 2012. India, China And Display Fuelling The Boost

The growing popularity of free mobile content — largely in the form of apps — is having a big impact on mobile advertising, the route that many developers and publishers are taking to monetize that content. Gartner has released its forecasts for mobile advertising today, and it predicts that this year, mobile ads will collectively bring in $11.4 billion in revenues, a rise of 18.75% on 2012′s $9.6 billion.

With that growth will also come an evolution in what kind of ads are doing best: display ads will grow faster than search and eventually overtake them, says Gartner. But other things will not change. The Asia Pacific region will keep its dominant position in mobile ads in 2013, and for the next three years, as the global market for mobile ads grows by a further 400% between now and 2016 to $24.5 billion.

Gartner, it should be pointed out, first published these projections in November 2012, but has actually revised them up. ”The mobile advertising market took off even faster than we expected due to an increased uptake in smartphones and tablets, as well as the merger of consumer behaviors on computers and mobile devices,” writes Stephanie Baghdassarian, research director at Gartner.

The growth of display advertising against search ads is down to a few different factors. The first of these is the increasing ubiquity of smartphones, and smartphone-like feature phones: while there is still an issue that one in every five smartphone owners never uses their device for anything other than basic voice and text, those that are using them for other services are proving to be voracious consumers of apps and mobile internet. That rise in usage means more eyeballs and more inventory for advertisers to fill.

“Smartphones and media tablets extend the addressable market for mobile advertising in more and more geographies as an increasing population of users spends an increasing share of its time with these devices,” writes Andrew Frank, research VP at Gartner. That usage, Gartner says, is currently very strong in native apps, although Gartner is in the camp of people who believe that mobile internet, and web apps, will ultimately become the more popular format over native apps.

The second trend is the fact that there are a number of new ad units that are rolling out to make the display ad experience more engaging: whether it is through reward schemes, or less invasive ways of serving those ads, these are, by many accounts, getting more people clicking on display ads, and more advertisers investing in using them.

The third is the decline of more traditional advertising, for example in newspapers and magazines. As these mediums get used less by consumers, media buyers and brands are turning to the places where consumers are reading more: tablets and smartphones. ”Growth in mobile advertising comes in part at the expense of print formats, especially local newspapers, which currently face much lower ad yields as a result of mobile publishing initiatives,” writes Baghdassarian.

But this does not mean search is disappearing — far from it. The rise of more integrated and functional maps, for example, will give that ad unit another big boost, as more brands and businesses look to buy paid placements on mapping apps. Gartner also highlights augmented reality as a rising category — but I personally remain skeptical that for now this is not more than a nice technology.

In terms of regional domination, Gartner points out an interesting shift taking place in Asia Pacific.

Whereas in the past the region was strong because of Japan and South Korea — two relatively small but early-adopting, mobile-crazy countries — its continuing prominence won’t be solely because of that. It will be down to China and India, two of the world’s biggest mobile markets, where we are seeing a big surge for smartphones and mobile data usage among a “growing middle class” of users.

North America and Western Europe, Gartner says, will “close the gap” on Asia with what Gartner refers to as “360-degree advertising campaigns.” This is another term for the kind of advertising thatGoogle is also pushing, with the idea that ads can follow you regardless of what device you happen to be using. (Creepy but possibly useful too.) Growth in the emerging regions of  Latin America, Eastern Europe and Africa will be led by gains in the big markets of Russia and Brazil, as well as Mexico.

Mobile Advertising Revenue by Region, Worldwide, 2012-2016

(Millions of Dollars)

2012

2013

2014

2016

North America

3,181.5

3,825.7

4,694.9

8,866.2

Western Europe

1,600.5

1,941.4

2,367.8

4,445.4

Asia/Pacific and Japan

4,333.0

4,864.9

5,506.7

9,480.2

Rest of the World

644.1

788.0

960.6

1,768.3

Total

9,759.1

11,420.0

13,530.0

24,560.1

Source: Gartner (November 2012)

Google Launches “Full Value Of Mobile” Calculator

To Help Businesses Measure Online And Offline Impact Of Mobile Marketing

FVM google

The market for mobile advertising is forecast to reach $11.4 billion this year on the back of explosive growth in smartphones and tablets, but companies like Google, currently the world leader in mobile advertising, are all too aware of a big issue that could trouble the industry longer-term: there aren’t enough tools out there for businesses to measure how effective their campaigns are relative to actual sales. So the search giant is taking the bull by the horns and rolling out a new service to combat that: a calculator, called the Full Value of Mobile, that helps businesses that use Google’s mobile advertising services — specifically using AdWords — to measure how their mobile marketing translates into actual business, both online and offline.

Perhaps not coincidentally, Google’s calculator is launching on the same day that local listings serviceYelp is releasing its own estimating tool for small businesses to measure the impact that Yelp is having on their business. It’s like the old saying about buses.

Google has already made some efforts in this space, for example by extending AdWords analytics into mobile, but as Johanna Werther, head of Mobile Ads Marketing, notes in a blog post, “with more work to be done to improve measurement tools, most marketers still account only for sales happening on a mobile site and aren’t seeing the full picture.”

The calculator, she says, provides “simple equations and benchmarks” that speak to different aspects of a mobile marketing campaign. For example, how many people phone you as a result of an ad (using Google’s automatic dialling feature); and what impact is a cross-device campaign having versus one across a single platform? The metrics, in a sense, bring into context the many features that Google has been building out for the platform, and provide a way for businesses to better access those analytics. This is important for small businesses in particular, who may not have the budgets for larger campaigns and teams of people to do this work for them.

Google claims that the set-up for using the new calculator takes only about 30 minutes, and other metrics that are revealed include total value, value per click, and ROI for a campaign. “You’ll also see how cost-effective your mobile CPAs are,” Werther notes.